General Musing

blaze your trail

Archive for the ‘algorithm’ Category

Spreading Passwords over Multiple Locations #security

leave a comment »

Spreading Passwords over Multiple Locations #security ??RSA’s new approach is a version of a technique known as threshold cryptography, which has long been explored by researchers. They split the password in chunks and store the chunks over multiple servers.

http://www.technologyreview.com/news/429498/to-keep-passwords-safe-from-hackers-just-break/

To Keep Passwords Safe from Hackers, Just Break Them into Bits – Technology Review

Millions of passwords have been stolen from companies such as LinkedIn and Yahoo. A new approach aims to prevent future heists.

View or comment on Dani??l Crompton’s post »

Advertisements

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

October 10, 2012 at 3:26 pm

Posted in algorithm, database, security

Tagged with ,

Just Finished Reading: Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother #books

leave a comment »

I started begging my mother for piano lessons from a very young age, had my mother been a Tiger Mother I would have been a child prodigy. I’d seen Amy Chua in an interview program and had wanted to read Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother as an instruction manual to raise my child as a music virtuoso. And although the book is not a step-by-step guide to becoming a Tiger Mother I am glad I read it.

The book is an autobiographical view of the way Amy Chua raised her daughters Sophia and Louisa (Lulu) to become straight A students, and focusses mainly on her teaching her children to play the musical instruments of her choice. In the end it devolves into a war of attrition between Amy and Lulu, resulting in a revelation for the Tiger Mother.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

April 27, 2012 at 8:37 am

Posted in algorithm, books, risk

Tagged with , , , , , , ,

Proof of Concept: Google Docs Mail Merge Form with Text and HTML #wordpress

with one comment

I needed a way to be able to shamelessly plug the posts I recently bundled into the booklet “Write Something” again.In a similar way to the last time I did it in Proof of Concept: Google Docs Mail Merge Form

As I explained before I have set up a system to automatically mail somebody when the enter their address in the form, my issue was that I wanted to add a unique blogpost which they would only be able to get by signing up. Naturally I wanted to style it in the same way the posts are styled in this blog. Again I turned to the documentation, specifically the Class MailApp which I was using to send the mail. Using this documentation I had a starting point. I wanted three changes to the current script:

  1. keep the plain text
  2. add HTML message
  3. add inline images

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

February 24, 2012 at 12:50 pm

Just Finished Reading: How Doctors Think #books

leave a comment »

My daughter’s Godmother is studying to be an MD, and has started her internship. Starting her internship coincided with her birthday, which meant that many of the presents she received were related to medicine. One of the gifts, which she gracefully allowed me to borrow before she read it was How Doctors Think, by Jerome Groopman, MD.

Groopman’s book covers one subject which I love: heuristics and bias. Heuristics are the stuff the practice of medicine is made of, which makes it a little strange that this isn’t always taught. The influence of the intuitive, fast, effortless System 1 thinking versus the slower, conscious, System 2 thinking is reasonably well known. System 1 allows us to unconsciously come to conclusions based on the information at hand, as Groopman says: “When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras.” The practice of medicine is such that most of the diseases encountered fit into a nice pattern, however it is also a burden which make cognitive bias possible. When a doctor sees nine patients who are suffering from flue symptoms, System 1 will quickly come to the conclusion that the diagnoses of the tenth patient with these symptoms is also flue, and will even ignore facts to the contrary. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

February 19, 2012 at 3:40 pm

Posted in algorithm, books, health, medical

Tagged with , ,

Proof of Concept: Google Docs Mail Merge Form #wordpress #updated

leave a comment »

I needed a way to be able to shamelessly plug the posts I recently bundled into the booklet “Write Something“. I want to build a list, and offering something which adds value for the subscriber is a good way to do this. There is a host of good material which you can use to help, so I won’t elaborate on that in this post.

I have a hosted WordPress.com blog, which means that I can’t run a local script to collect the mail addresses and mail them, so I turned to Google Docs’ Form functionality for the entry form, naturally I give them the option to download the booklet there, and I wanted to send the subscriber a message to thank them. In the Google tutorial: Simple Mail Merge they explain how to do a mail merge using the Script Editor. I wanted to go a little further and have it send a mail with thank you note and a link to each subscriber as soon as they filled in the form.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

January 23, 2012 at 9:59 pm

Coriolanus Effect and Wakoopa Stats #productivity #timemanagement

with one comment

I first started writing about Wakoopa in 2009, when I wrote the article Time Spend, is Time Earned on using it for time management, it has mostly been running in the background to give me some statistics on the way I use my time behind my computer, and whether it is used effectively. Recently I started a new projects with new computers and again installed the Wakoopa Tracker to measure the effective use of my time. Naturally the Parato principle still holds, roughly 80% of the effects come from 20% of the causes.

Coriolanus effect: n. the act of going around in ever decreasing circles until one vanishes up one’s own backside.
Glaswegian expression

For Sunday it is possible to see the amount of time I spend creating a Christmas card, and I see that – split over Mac and Windows – I seem to be spending the productive 62% of my office time on development, documentation and mail. Again I can also immediately see correlations between any dips in time – such as Monday – and real events, in this case meetings. Furthermore the relatively short time spend on development on Monday can be seen to have a ripple effect that continues on Tuesday and Wednesday. I’m sure that had the statistics been available for Thursday this line would continue.

Using my calendar I could get a similar graph, and although the details of how long I was “researching” a recent XKCD joke are still lots be lost, Wakoopa enables me to see the usage of my time slightly better and the collection is entirely passive.

Image source: Wakoopa

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

December 16, 2011 at 2:08 pm

Kings of Code Conference #kingsofcode

with 2 comments

This week I went to the Kings of Code Conference, to “explore and discuss the latest trends, developments and best practices in web and mobile development technologies.” It included a hackbattle, lots of presentations and free beer.

HackBattle

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

September 23, 2011 at 1:35 pm

%d bloggers like this: