General Musing

blaze your trail

Archive for the ‘programming’ Category

What is wrong with ICT?

leave a comment »

A day ago I read PHP: A fractal of bad design, and it made me sit down and think about writing this entry, of which the kernel has been gestating for quite a long time.

I see this a lot; pro’s ranting about an aspect of our ‘craft’ that has gone totally pear-shaped; programmers complaining about the languages or the quality of code they are asked to fix and/or maintain, systems administrators that just can not believe the insanity that is brought down on them because of either laziness of the in-house personnel or management-made bylaws.

Cryptographic specialists (even mildly spoken ones like Bruce Schneier), hackers nee security specialists, software designers… the whole palette of people that actually are proficient in their work gripe and complain.

Read the rest of this entry »

Advertisements

Written by Adrianus Warmenhoven

April 17, 2012 at 11:27 am

Posted in business, programming, risk, technology

Tagged with ,

Red Hat Open Cloud Tour #RHCTams #conference [UPDATED]

leave a comment »

Today I spend my day at the Red Hat Open Cloud Tour, this is what happened today:

Just heard the opening by Rajiv Sodhi, who is here despite having a baby due any moment.

Margaret J. Rimmler’s keynote was interesting. One of the key takeaways being openness RedHat customers should have the choice to remain portable and replace RedHat, if that is what they want. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

April 3, 2012 at 7:43 pm

Scrum Masters as Sri Ganesha’s pundits #agile #xp

with 2 comments

You would probably not associate a god from the Indian pantheon with an Agile methodological, and there are many things that can be learned for Scrum masters from Ganesh.

In Scrum the Scrum Master focuses on 4 key areas:

  • remove impediments
  • buffer against distracting influences
  • enforcer of rules
  • focusing team on tasks

Ganesha is the Lord of Obstacles, both material and spiritually. And is worshiped as the remover of obstacles, although he also places obstacles in the path of worshipers. The Scrum Master also removes the impediments and places obstacles in the path of the team members. Ganesha fans his ears constantly to symbolize that often words are spoken, but one is not receiving inside. This is what happens when the length of the meetings is too long, or it digresses off-topic. This is also what the broken tusk is said to symbolize, with oneness of mind and single-minded devotion you can achieve everything. In your team you can keep your focus by focussing the energies on the ability of the team to create results, and allowing the members to achieve.

Image source: Vijay Bandari – Wikipedia, Anamika S

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

March 29, 2012 at 11:15 am

Posted in business, humour, programming

Tagged with , , , ,

Proof of Concept: Use Everywhere #bash

leave a comment »

For a while I’ve been using custom tools to perform certain task that I wasn’t able to do with the shell tools provided. Or which worked differently on each of the Unix platforms I worked on. I mostly solved this by adding any custom scripts to the bundle that I deployed. This naturally didn’t work for compiled programs, due to different processors and kernel stacks.

When I came to a platform for which I had not yet compiled my custom tool I would compile it and add it to my custom share, USB-stick or CVS. I would name the tool <name>-<machine>-<system> which would allow me to ship the bundle with a version which was compiled specifically for that platform, or for multiple platforms. I would then call my wrapper script which would call the specific binary for the current platform.

I […] am rarely happier than when spending an entire day programming my computer to perform automatically a task that it would otherwise take me a good ten seconds to do by hand. Ten seconds, I tell myself, is ten seconds. Time is valuable and ten seconds’ worth of it is well worth the investment of a day’s happy activity working out a way of saving it.
Douglas Adams

Naturally I borrowed the idea from somebody, although I can no longer remember who.

Image source: pastebin

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

March 10, 2012 at 12:48 pm

Posted in hardware, OS, programming

Tagged with , ,

Proof of Concept: Google Docs Mail Merge Form with Text and HTML #wordpress

with one comment

I needed a way to be able to shamelessly plug the posts I recently bundled into the booklet “Write Something” again.In a similar way to the last time I did it in Proof of Concept: Google Docs Mail Merge Form

As I explained before I have set up a system to automatically mail somebody when the enter their address in the form, my issue was that I wanted to add a unique blogpost which they would only be able to get by signing up. Naturally I wanted to style it in the same way the posts are styled in this blog. Again I turned to the documentation, specifically the Class MailApp which I was using to send the mail. Using this documentation I had a starting point. I wanted three changes to the current script:

  1. keep the plain text
  2. add HTML message
  3. add inline images

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

February 24, 2012 at 12:50 pm

Just Finished Reading: How Doctors Think #books

leave a comment »

My daughter’s Godmother is studying to be an MD, and has started her internship. Starting her internship coincided with her birthday, which meant that many of the presents she received were related to medicine. One of the gifts, which she gracefully allowed me to borrow before she read it was How Doctors Think, by Jerome Groopman, MD.

Groopman’s book covers one subject which I love: heuristics and bias. Heuristics are the stuff the practice of medicine is made of, which makes it a little strange that this isn’t always taught. The influence of the intuitive, fast, effortless System 1 thinking versus the slower, conscious, System 2 thinking is reasonably well known. System 1 allows us to unconsciously come to conclusions based on the information at hand, as Groopman says: “When you hear hoofbeats, think horses, not zebras.” The practice of medicine is such that most of the diseases encountered fit into a nice pattern, however it is also a burden which make cognitive bias possible. When a doctor sees nine patients who are suffering from flue symptoms, System 1 will quickly come to the conclusion that the diagnoses of the tenth patient with these symptoms is also flue, and will even ignore facts to the contrary. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

February 19, 2012 at 3:40 pm

Posted in algorithm, books, health, medical

Tagged with , ,

Proof of Concept: Google Docs Mail Merge Form #wordpress #updated

leave a comment »

I needed a way to be able to shamelessly plug the posts I recently bundled into the booklet “Write Something“. I want to build a list, and offering something which adds value for the subscriber is a good way to do this. There is a host of good material which you can use to help, so I won’t elaborate on that in this post.

I have a hosted WordPress.com blog, which means that I can’t run a local script to collect the mail addresses and mail them, so I turned to Google Docs’ Form functionality for the entry form, naturally I give them the option to download the booklet there, and I wanted to send the subscriber a message to thank them. In the Google tutorial: Simple Mail Merge they explain how to do a mail merge using the Script Editor. I wanted to go a little further and have it send a mail with thank you note and a link to each subscriber as soon as they filled in the form.

Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

January 23, 2012 at 9:59 pm

%d bloggers like this: