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Just Finished Reading: The Internet is a Playground #books

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I advised The Internet is a Playground to a close friend, and he thought it was brilliant. I also think David Thorne is hilarious and have read most of the posts, if not all, on 27b/6. Which is why I thought I would love this book, I was sadly mistaken. Thorne is brilliant, and although his anecdotes and mail exchanges are hysterical the first time and amusing the next many loose a lot in the retelling. There are some obvious exceptions to this, but I was saddened by the lack of much new material.

Thorne manages to turn most of his personal attacks on people in to humorous anecdotes, turning round the impositions people put on him against the person. Whether it is making graphics, a poster for a missing cat or selling him a pair of bad gloves. Even attacks on him for being petty, bigoted or lazy are turned round against the attackers showing that their attacks stem from their own interpretation. I’d even go so far as to say that their dislike of Thorne stems from a dislike of aspects of themselves.

I would certainly recommend this book to somebody who has not read the posts on his website. I must say that while reading the book my girlfriend asked me to stop laughing multiple times, and left the house. I think she’s jealous of my relationship with David Thorne.

Image source: Amazon

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Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

June 19, 2011 at 10:43 am

Posted in books

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This year’s book reviews #2010

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Programming Hands

As always I read far more in 2010 than I blogged about, and most of the books I did blog about were treasures. I hope I inspired you to read at least one of them. And you have certainly noticed that I have added them all to the bookstore to make it easier for you to find out more about them.

I’ve had this title in my head for about a week now, the title is natur…

I’m reading Bruce Sterling‘s Islands in the Net – Amazon de…

As followers of mine will know I love xkcd, and he has some gems such as this…

I read Amsterdam: The Brief Life of a City by Geert Mak in English rather tha…

I’ve seen the film more than a dozen times, but I had yet to read Star …

Brian Jacques‘s book Outcast of Redwallfollows Veil the ferret who is r…

The Odessa File, by Frederick Forsyth, is another of the books I am keeping s…

Brian Jacques‘s book Martin the Warrior is another book from the Redwal…

I found The Moon’s a Balloon, by David Niven, in a box of old books. I …

Mossflower by Brian Jacques is probably my favourite of the Redwall series, t…

Timothy Leary once told us to “Turn on, tune in, drop out“, and a…

For some reason I had the book Rosalind Franklin: The Dark Lady of DNA, by Br…

After having seen many films and read many books I expected that Hitler: The …

One of my first real American comics was Thor, I really liked it. Sadly it re…

I like Ontologies, Taxonomies and Folksonomies. I’m currently reading W…

I read Mario Puzo famed book The Godfather after having seen the movie a numb…

As I previously said I bought Anathem at the same time I bought Cryptonomicon…

I borrowed a number of books from an aunt of mine, who reviewed these books f…

I was standing in a secondhand book store with my father, and we wandered rou…

As an early Christmas gift my father gave me vouchers he didn’t want to…

The Snake is the first book I have read by John Godey, it was recommended to …

In the company I work for they are introducing the Agile FrameWork, in the fo…

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Just Finished Reading “The Moon’s a Balloon” #books

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I found The Moon’s a Balloon, by David Niven, in a box of old books. I knew David Niven as an actor, and have seen quite a number of films he starred in, such as The Pink Panther; Casino Royale; Death on the Nile; The Guns of Navarone; and The Prisoner of Zenda. Naturally I was interested to know more about him.

Niven is like a character out of the movies he’s played in, there seems to be little that he hasn’t done or been: soldier; race organizer; actor; and philanderer.

The book immediately opens with Niven’s introduction of Nessie, the 17 year old whore who he lost his virginity to aged 14, referring the reader to a later page in case they would like to skip straight to the sordid details. It continues with war torn London in the First World War and the loss of his father, and replacement with a stepfather. The book chronicles being expelled multiple times from boarding-school. Eventually joining the army, before resigning his commission and going of the the United States to seek fame and glory. Rubbing shoulders with Winston Churchill at the height of the Second World War. Had this not been a true story I wouldn’t have believed it.

A unbelievable and funny read.

Written by Daniël W. Crompton (webhat)

July 10, 2010 at 2:33 pm

Posted in books, movie

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